Skip to main content

Photo: Ole Martin Halvorsen / Courtesy of Envelope 1976

Party clothes for a post-lockdown life have been the talk of fashion, but what appears freshest to my eye—and seems more in tune with current events—is a cleaned-up and pared-down look that whispers rather than shouts. That’s just what the emerging Oslo label Envelope 1976 delivers in a very personal way.

Photo: Ole Martin Halvorsen / Courtesy of Envelope 1976

The brand was cofounded with a focus on responsible fashion by creative director Celine Aagaard, an editor, stylist, and sometime influencer, and Pia Nordskaug, CEO of Ecologic, Envelope 1976’s parent company. The label is an extension of Aagaard’s own unerring, minimal style. This gives the collection context and a point of view. “I’m 100% in everything I do,” said Aagaard via phone, “but I don’t want to focus on myself.”

Photo: Ole Martin Halvorsen / Courtesy of Envelope 1976

Photo: Ole Martin Halvorsen / Courtesy of Envelope 1976

Photo: Ole Martin Halvorsen / Courtesy of Envelope 1976

Photo: Ole Martin Halvorsen / Courtesy of Envelope 1976

Despite being a public figure with close to 200,000 followers, Aagaard does manage to keep a fairly low profile. “From the very beginning, we were working very slowly; everything was kept a secret. We didn’t want to rush anything then, and actually we still don’t want to rush things,” she explained. “Moving slow, moving forward” is one of the phrases Aagaard has attached to the brand’s new fall collection. “We don’t want to push what’s coming next [and encourage consumption],” she said of the label’s approach

Photo: Ole Martin Halvorsen / Courtesy of Envelope 1976

Photo: Ole Martin Halvorsen / Courtesy of Envelope 1976

The brand’s current drop, developed during lockdown, is a sort of love letter to Oslo, particularly its architecture and way of life, which is close to nature. Made from natural and biodegradable materials, the clothes are designed to be wardrobe workhorses, combining form and function. A hand-knit sweater has sleeves that button on and off, and Aagaard is increasingly focused on genderless designs. While Envelope 1976’s first hits were silky dresses, the addition of leather jackets with customizable zippered arms brings a bit of edge to the overall offering.

Envelope 1976’s concept store in Oslo.
Photo: Courtesy of Envelope 1976

Come September, the first Envelope 1976 shop will open near Oslo’s new Munch Museum. Aagaard and Nordskaug have extended their sustainable practices to its design. The racks, for example, are made from reclaimed materials by F5 Collective, and the furniture has been bought secondhand or is on loan to the store. The most striking design elements are the rocks that are used both functionally and as decor. These were picked by Aagaard (a self-described “rock nerd”) at Lundhs Real Stone quarry, in the city her boyfriend is from. The idea is that the space can be used by friends and artists as well and become a hub of creativity. “I hope,” said Aagaard, “we can all support each other in that way.”

The racks were made by F5 Collective.
Photo: Courtesy of Envelope 1976

Stone from leftovers from interiors industry.
Photo: Courtesy of Envelope 1976

Photo: Ole Martin Halvorsen / Courtesy of Envelope 1976

eco.logic

Author eco.logic

More posts by eco.logic

Leave a Reply